2015 BUILDOFF ENTRY Open Class Powell Challenger

Mini Bike & Go-Kart Parts

#21
I ordered seven "6203 2RS Double Sealed Bearing 17mm x 40mm x 12mm" bearings from Ebay. Perfect fit and replacement for the Powell wheels, the two in the driven pulley, and the one in the belt tensioner. Tensioner shown below before welding. I had to separate it to get the pulley out. By the way, the same place that sold the bearings, also had the B31 belt and I got that as well.



Other parts on order:
Woven brake lining, as used on Model T transmissions, and JB Weld high temp 8280 for the adhesive.
Also, 428S tail light, and universal spring activated brake light switch. Once I have these, I can fabricate a replacement mount for them, as the original was cut off.
 
#22
your builds and explanations are amazing dave and I thank you for it........I have a powell frame with not many original parts and your thread will help greatly!!!!! GOOD WORK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:thumbsup:
 

T-Town Mini

Well-Known Member
#23
Glad to see you making progress on this build, Dave. Keep the updates and pictures coming. :thumbsup: It'll be real interesting to see how the brake lining is applied.

your builds and explanations are amazing dave and I thank you for it........I have a powell frame with not many original parts and your thread will help greatly!!!!! GOOD WORK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:thumbsup:
That's sort of the same situation I'm in...I've got the Powell but no pile of parts.
 
#24
I really like all the old, faded, chiped,scratched,chingowed,paint and age spots. The are only original the first time. Hats off to you for not painting over its maturity!
 
#25
The plastic guard was beat up, scratched and dented with a large crack in it. Dents were brought out as much as possible with heat gun and anvil.


Strips of glass mat, and cloth. West System 404 (very fine micro-spheres) are added to polyester resin to make a loose paste. MEKP is added once the slurry is loaded on to a board, and the repair proceeded to fill in the crack from the back side.


Additional 404 added to slurry to make a thicker compound, catalyzed, and defects skinned, sanded, skinned, then final high build primer applied. More sanding required followed by sealer coat, top coat, and urethane clear.


This repair typical of fiberglass most repairs. Alternative would have been epoxy, but adhesion with polyester was good.
 
#28
your builds and explanations are amazing dave and I thank you for it........I have a powell frame with not many original parts and your thread will help greatly!!!!! GOOD WORK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:thumbsup:
Thank you Tippy. I try and offer explanations and part numbers/sources so the next guy (or gal) has a reference of what not to do. :laugh:

Glad to see you making progress on this build, Dave. Keep the updates and pictures coming. :thumbsup: It'll be real interesting to see how the brake lining is applied.
Thanks T-Town, I received the brake roll yesterday. I am happy with what I bought, and plan to simply measure, cut, glue and clamp. I suspect I'll need three hands for this. CarPlay here has done this before and recommended placing the wheel upside to hold it all in while curing. This is my next project, and looking forward to it.

I really like all the old, faded, chiped,scratched,chingowed,paint and age spots. The are only original the first time. Hats off to you for not painting over its maturity!
I hate to disappoint you Robert, but this thing will be painted. Too much rust, and a need to do a few welds which will require a repaint. I got some left over paint from a friend the other night- a BMW code bright red two stage from PPG.

That's just amazing work Dave!! I've never done repairs like that and you make it look like a walk in the park!! :thumbsup:
Thanks Jdogg, it's pretty straight forward. It just takes patience and a lot of sanding- which I completely detest. The West 404 I mentioned makes a slurry (like Bondo) but allows you to control the viscosity. Unlike Bondo, it's extremely fine, and sands out so you don't need glazing putty to cover pin holes.

that's some amazing work dave :thumbsup::thumbsup: better than new
Thank you trinik. Something I will have to live with, is that the pebble-grain surface on the original guards will be gone. Since I am too cheap to buy dulling agent, the end result will be over-gloss from the original plastic matte. I'll probably have to ride it with bare feet, to keep from rubbing into the paint job, and exposing the glass work. :wink:
 
#30
Hello Dave : Great work on a great bike my first ride on a Powell was on a brand new one. That came about when I went to Powell to picks up some needed parts my customers asked for as things like throttle cables and belts were not that available any other place. Well a trip to Powell's was just about 12 miles away and when you arrived you encountered all people were lets say old timers. They were very nice people and very helpful so I got a first hand look at their shop and of course left with all my parts and an application to become a dealer. The hook was already set because of the size of the bike was perfect for a shorty like me. So I talked my partners into letting me buy a shop demo and it was a Phantom 7 SL of course the biggest the best of the lot and I just loved the ride on and off road it was a mans machine.
So when your finished with your build you have a winner hands down and the money spent just fades away with every mile you ride it. And Powell's always got respect like the Tote Gote's they were well built in AMERICA. I always thought they were special with all the neat thing they did like the removable front end and the seat and the wide stance of the frame made to sit down flat on the floor. And the throttle assembly with its quick release all made it so complete no shortcuts taken. The brake was very effective and easy to use.
I will be watching your progress with envy and faith that you will do it up right.
Steve
 
#35
Dave not sure how I missed this build but it's gonna be good . If I can help just ask , but not for parts .:smile: . We need them and once you have them you don't let go of them .

I want to restore mine sometime when I have time . And I mean original , not the way my brother does them .
 
#36
That's just awesome sir:thumbsup:
Thank you sir. Not near as difficult as bending frames in your shop, or building bikes in SA, where parts are scarce.

Great work on a great bike my first ride on a Powell was on a brand new one. That came about when I went to Powell to picks up some needed parts my customers asked for as things like throttle cables and belts were not that available any other place. Well a trip to Powell's was just about 12 miles away and when you arrived you encountered all people were lets say old timers. They were very nice people and very helpful so I got a first hand look at their shop and of course left with all my parts and an application to become a dealer. The hook was already set because of the size of the bike was perfect for a shorty like me. So I talked my partners into letting me buy a shop demo and it was a Phantom 7 SL of course the biggest the best of the lot and I just loved the ride on and off road it was a mans machine.
Steve, it is a treat to hear your experiences, and we're lucky to have you here. Thank you for your interest. I have never rode one of these, but my motivation on restoring it was based on my appreciation of function over form, to the point perhaps where plain becomes beauty.

I bet Dave has at least 29 more mixing containers! Very impressive work Dave!
Thanks Eric, I do indeed maintain an adequate supply of these containers.

I'd wager he went through at least 5 on this project.
I work on a reward system, so limit myself to 12 but only AFTER the work is done. I maintain a stock of three empties in the can crusher, just in case I need to mix something. As an added bonus, when she comes out to check on me, I'm rolling with no more than three, no matter what.

Nice work Dave :thumbsup:
Thanks sir.
Wow, that's a excellent save on that cover. Nice tutoring as well.
Thanks- I really wasn't trying to "tutor" since all of this info is on the net with videos. A real dude would have used a plastic welder.

Dave not sure how I missed this build but it's gonna be good . If I can help just ask , but not for parts .:smile: . We need them and once you have them you don't let go of them. I want to restore mine sometime when I have time . And I mean original , not the way my brother does them.
Thanks- both you and your brother do great things with these bikes. I think you should stick with modifying them, using modern parts, so you can SEND ME A THROTTLE SETUP. :laugh:
 
#37
Here is the rear wheel, brake band, glue and clamps. Acetone applied where the glue goes. Took several tries to get the band the right length. Since it's thicker than what was on there, it needed to be slightly shorter to fit. JB Weld "Industro" good for 500F.


Clamped in place after JB Weld was applied to the wheel. I could have used more clamps, with more holding power. One shot deal. Screw this up, and it's a strip, sand and repaint.


I am not in the habit of painting aluminum wheels, however on the Powell, one half is steel, the other aluminum, so I had to match them. Used "chrome" rattle can after primer, cure, then two coats of urethane clear. The color looked way better before I cleared it, but at least the paint will stay on. Bearings installed- the $1.50 ones, not the $25 ones.
All threads had to be re-tapped. On disassembly, some of the bolts broke off in the wheel. Drilled and tapped. I like to use thread lubricant any time I am putting steel fasteners into threaded aluminum.
 
#40
My wheels had funky stainless allen bolts that bonded to the aluminum side and had to be tapped. There is a nice restored phantom on ebay. He couldn't find a throttle either. They are rare and when the do pop up they want you to back up the brinks truck. Nice build. Good luck.
 

Top