Coleman BT200X

Mini Bike & Go-Kart Parts

#1
Just picked up a Coleman BT200X, been hitting the trails while waiting for the upgrades to start rolling in. I'm really impressed with this bike and plan to build it to handle just about any hill/terrain that comes in it's path. First I'll be installing a torque converter and engine riser plate. I plan on using a 7" driven clutch, a 9 tooth front sprocket and a 60 tooth or 72 tooth rear sprocket along with 20x7x8 knobby tires. I'm going for maximum trail machine, 25-30 MPH is my target speed running mostly stock parts. I'll post the progress I make and the hurdles I endure on the build so others who want to do a similar build might find something useful.

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#2
Just picked up a Coleman BT200X, been hitting the trails while waiting for the upgrades to start rolling in. I'm really impressed with this bike and plan to build it to handle just about any hill/terrain that comes in it's path. First I'll be installing a torque converter and engine riser plate. I plan on using a 7" driven clutch, a 9 tooth front sprocket and a 60 tooth or 72 tooth rear sprocket along with 20x7x8 knobby tires. I'm going for maximum trail machine, 25-30 MPH is my target speed running mostly stock parts. I'll post the progress I make and the hurdles I endure on the build so others who want to do a similar build might find something useful.

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My BT200X is modified similar to what you want.
Go to the link below to see my bike in action.
Any questions, just ask me.

It's an absolute blast!
 

toomanytoys

Well-Known Member
#5
I'm interested to see how your bike responds.

I'm not sure I'd go to a 72 tooth. 10/60 on my ct200u is a wheelie machine. Gotta pay attention when taking off and it will stand up on a hill climb.

Another good upgrade is tires! Those stockers work ok but a good beefy tire makes a huge difference.
 
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#6
I'm interested to see how your bike responds.

I'm not sure I'd go to a 72 tooth. 10/60 on my ct200u is a wheelie machine. Gotta pay attention when taking off and it will stand up on a hill climb.

Another good upgrade is tires! Those stockers work ok but a good beefy tire makes a huge difference.
Yeah. tires, I drool when I see what I can get, but for now the 'Wanda's' are a good ride for now.
My sprocket is stock, with my set up, I am happy with it, It handles all the trails and hills as steep as I can handle, but yeah, I was way worse climbing hills before as it's pretty hard to steer when your doing wheelies, I lean forward more now, and better throttle control.
 

toomanytoys

Well-Known Member
#7
Yeah. tires, I drool when I see what I can get, but for now the 'Wanda's' are a good ride for now.
My sprocket is stock, with my set up, I am happy with it, It handles all the trails and hills as steep as I can handle, but yeah, I was way worse climbing hills before as it's pretty hard to steer when your doing wheelies, I lean forward more now, and better throttle control.
Stock tires lasted 1 summer on my ct200u. The back was smooth. Front looked new. Exactly how my motorcycle tires look at the moment.....
 
#8
I'm interested to see how your bike responds.

I'm not sure I'd go to a 72 tooth. 10/60 on my ct200u is a wheelie machine. Gotta pay attention when taking off and it will stand up on a hill climb.

Another good upgrade is tires! Those stockers work ok but a good beefy tire makes a huge difference.
I'll start with the 6" driven and the 9/60 sprockets and see where that gets me. The 7" driven won't fit under the cover and I'd really like to keep the moving parts covered so stuff doesn't get caught in the belt. I'm even leaving the stock carb, I've seen where the Chikuni carbs have broke off when dumped on the side, the less stuff sticking out the better.
 
#11
So my first hurdle is the torque converter. Pretty much everyone knows that the 196cc HiSun engine that comes on the BT200X has a 16mm crankshaft and the drive clutch has a 3/4" bore. Being 16mm, it's .005" bigger than 5/8" and those 5/8" to 3/4" shaft adapters need to be sanded down to work smoothly. Not wanting to mess with any of that, or pull the engine apart for a crank swap, I figured I'd grab my non-hemi predator and just put the lighting coil and flywheel on it. Well, that won't work either, the tank mounts are different and I want to use the Coleman tank. I also noticed that the torque converter backing plate not only hits the cooling tins, it hits the oil fill plug too. Even with the oil fill plug trimmed, the backing plate will push on the fill plug enough to see a gap between the gasket and side cover. The Hisun doesn't have a rear fill plug and that actually works to my advantage. I have already ordered the 3/4" crank for it as the one I had on hand didn't have the governor gear and I don't feel like swapping that out either, my luck, I'd get it apart and they'd be different sizes. My engine riser plate is on the way and I should be getting my 20x7x8 knobby tires tomorrow. I ordered new rims from Go Power Sports, I figure the $80 for the set is worth not having to pull a set of tires and install a set. That's a lot of work when you don't have the right tools!, this way I just install a set and have a spare.
 
#12
So my first hurdle is the torque converter. Pretty much everyone knows that the 196cc HiSun engine that comes on the BT200X has a 16mm crankshaft and the drive clutch has a 3/4" bore. Being 16mm, it's .005" bigger than 5/8" and those 5/8" to 3/4" shaft adapters need to be sanded down to work smoothly. Not wanting to....................................................................................
yup, I ordered a crank without a gear, I figured ,...welp, the guvna's gotta go then,, so it did, and it was done...
I am using the Hisun and I have seen on videos guys shaving down there, where the rear backing plate cover screw hole is, they would shave or grind it off, because there was an interference fit, the screw, I just figured 'I'll just remove the screw...SOLVED!' The backing plate holds the cooling fin snug, and every thing else fits just right.

I didn't grind down the plate, all that crap those other guys did...I removed the screw....just...MAN!...wow.
 

SAS289

Well-Known Member
#13
yup, I ordered a crank without a gear, I figured ,...welp, the guvna's gotta go then,, so it did, and it was done...
I am using the Hisun and I have seen on videos guys shaving down there, where the rear backing plate cover screw hole is, they would shave or grind it off, because there was an interference fit, the screw, I just figured 'I'll just remove the screw...SOLVED!' The backing plate holds the cooling fin snug, and every thing else fits just right.

I didn't grind down the plate, all that crap those other guys did...I removed the screw....just...MAN!...wow.
A lot of people miss that and bind the backing plate into the bolt. Some will even remove the cooling tin.
 
#15
Nope, just the screw, remove it, that's it.
I'll have to look again but it seems like it was just in front of the screw. It looks like I could just notch the tin or dent it in and it would be fine. At first I thought the backing plate would do it but even as thick as it is, it flexes. Perhaps a button head screw would do the trick, just to keep the rattle down?, I don't like removing the tins altogether, they're there for a reason. I was watching a video of a HiSun tear down and found it has a nylon cam or cam gear, don't really like that idea either.
 
#16
Next time I do my regular TC maintenance I'll snap a picture.
I don't know if there are much differences between TC's, but mine was branded 'BraveX'.
The cooling shroud snugs in tight minus a screw/bolt with the backing plate bolted on, there are no stresses or bends on the plate to make it fit, it just does.
 
#17
Well, I pretty much got everything except the 3/4" crankshaft this week. I put the tires on the rims, installed the 60T sprocket ( the 72T is HUGE! ) and swapped out the green plastics for the red plastics today. I was really hoping that if I moved the engine all the way back and the axle all the way forward I could reuse the chain... NOPE!, looks like I'll have to grab some more chain. Once the crankshaft arrives, I'll get to working on the torque converter, as for now without a chain it's just a lawn ornament.

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#18
The plate snugs the shroud in good, no rattle, however, a low profile bolt wouldn't hurt to try.
And as far as a nylon cam sprocket is concerned, I have no issue with, nylon is tough stuff, and there is no metal to metal.
 
#19
While sitting in limbo I figured I would see how the engine riser plate fit. While it is the cleanest way to install a torque converter on a Coleman, there's still PLENTY of room for improvements. On a scale of 1-10, I'd give it a 3-1/2, Go Power Sports kit gets 1/2 a point on a scale of 1-10. When I opened the package, the first thing I noticed is that the powder coat just flakes off, not happy about that!. Second was alignment of the 3 parts that make up the mount. What's the point of CNC if you're going to weld it together crooked?. Third, this riser plate is pretty specific as to what bikes it's used on, one would think they would make it as wide as the original engine plate... NOPE!, it hangs over the outside edge about 1/8". Number four, why make slots in the riser plate when the original plate has slots?, not like I can adjust the engine more in any one direction and it just makes things sloppier while lining the engine up. Number five, while the Riv-nuts are a nice touch, they aren't metric like the rest of the bike and I can't stand having to dig out one SAE wrench for one simple task. If the Riv-Nuts were metric, I could reuse my original engine bolts which would lower the cost of the kit due to less supplied hardware. While I'm on the metric subject, It would have been nice for the rest of the hardware that comes with the plate to be metric too. Not only that, the supplied bolts are barely long enough to use the thick washers for under the original engine plate, I like to see at least 2-3 threads of the bolt, not the nut!.

If that's not enough, I would have to say that the worst part is, I paid more for it on eBay from the person who owns this forum, not the "Warehouse" because it was powder coated and I would like to show MY support by giving back. The listing had an option to "Make An Offer" which I did and not only was my offer not accepted, there was no counter offer or reply for that matter, why have the option if you're going to ignore those who try?. After I received it, I sent pictures of the poor powder coat, that was 2 days ago, still haven't heard back... cricket, cricket. Sure, one might say "Chill, it's just a mini bike part", it's not about that, it's that I went out of my way to show MY support by buying from him rather than a competitor and the silent treatment is the best I get?.

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#20
While sitting in limbo I figured I would see how the engine riser plate fit. While it is the cleanest way to install a torque converter on a Coleman, there's still PLENTY of room for improvements. On a scale of 1-10, I'd give it a 3-1/2, Go Power Sports kit gets 1/2 a point on a scale of 1-10. When I opened the package, the first thing I noticed is that the powder coat just flakes off, not happy about that!. Second was alignment of the 3 parts that make up the mount. What's the point of CNC if you're going to weld it together crooked?. Third, this riser plate is pretty specific as to what bikes it's used on, one would think they would make it as wide as the original engine plate... NOPE!, it hangs over the outside edge about 1/8". Number four, why make slots in the riser plate when the original plate has slots?, not like I can adjust the engine more in any one direction and it just makes things sloppier while lining the engine up. Number five, while the Riv-nuts are a nice touch, they aren't metric like the rest of the bike and I can't stand having to dig out one SAE wrench for one simple task. If the Riv-Nuts were metric, I could reuse my original engine bolts which would lower the cost of the kit due to less supplied hardware. While I'm on the metric subject, It would have been nice for the rest of the hardware that comes with the plate to be metric too. Not only that, the supplied bolts are barely long enough to use the thick washers for under the original engine plate, I like to see at least 2-3 threads of the bolt, not the nut!.

If that's not enough, I would have to say that the worst part is, I paid more for it on eBay from the person who owns this forum, not the "Warehouse" because it was powder coated and I would like to show MY support by giving back. The listing had an option to "Make An Offer" which I did and not only was my offer not accepted, there was no counter offer or reply for that matter, why have the option if you're going to ignore those who try?. After I received it, I sent pictures of the poor powder coat, that was 2 days ago, still haven't heard back... cricket, cricket. Sure, one might say "Chill, it's just a mini bike part", it's not about that, it's that I went out of my way to show MY support by buying from him rather than a competitor and the silent treatment is the best I get?.

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I was talking to my Dad about going to buy bolts for my engine mounts, "Oh I have some of those", he said.
I put them on, then took them off, I didn't use them as they were SAE, like you, I want to keep it metric.

As far as the risers, I made my own, I hate drilling holes though, my bits always go dull before the first hole, perhaps I should discover the wonders of cutting fluid? So I just hacked holes in it with my angle grinder, quick and dirty, but functional.
That riser plate weighs much more than a couple 1" square tubing.

But I like to make my own sh...er crap if I can, everything is my own fault.
 

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