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  1. #11
    Randy's Avatar
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    Also, if any of you guys need them I would gladly trace my panels.
    Randy

  2. #12
    Senior Member MINI-MATIC's Avatar
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    Hi Randy,Your bike is most likely a model C ,early second generation.The side panels should be rounded at the bottom.Black grips,the fluid drive clutches were used on the very first Doodlebugs and also on the early runs of the second generation model C ,that is most likely what you have.It must also be noted that your bike had the 3 slot chain guard,whether it has a fluid drive or the Mepco centrifugal clutch being it's a model C,second generation.Your engine should be a Briggs NP model type 306707 later second generation model D would be a 306709.My 1946 Bug for sure had a fluid drive clutch,5 slot guard, and a Briggs NP type 306705. I hope this helps you out Randy.

  3. #13
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    Mini-matic, my cover is the 3 slot version.

    The tracings I'm working on aren't coming out as nice as I had planned.
    I tried to take some close pictures with a ruler but my camera cant do it. I'm going to try poster board. I'll have something for you guys soon.

  4. #14
    Randy's Avatar
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    Whatever you do is great and very much appreciated. Poster board sounds like a good idea. Let me know what you have invested in it. And you may end up needing a large postal envelope to mail it, either way. I’ll reimburse you for your shipping and so forth. If your not happy with your template I would give you a “large enough” deposit so you would be sure to get your guard back and I can make templates. Or better yet, I would put up the deposit and have you send it to Steve or Oldsalt to copy. There the fabricators more so then myself.

    Thanks again, Randy

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randy View Post
    Steve, Rambler or anyone, Is the 5 slot fluid drive and the 3 slot for the clutch type? I think so? Mines early with the brake/throttle set up. But I have no idea what engine it had, and I did not get the side panels with it. But it has black grips so I think it's a 2nd or 3rd run according to yesteryears info. With that said I guess I'll do it with three slots. The panels I got are horse hoofed, I'm going to round them off. I traced the frame contour on them at the bottom and then luckly relized that they loop down past the frame. I'm glad I did not start cutting.
    Can anyone decode the VIN on these bikes?
    Ser.#106133 Model #1046D

    Your ID tag indicates the machine is a model D (not a model C like someone else mentioned). The serial numbers on Doodle bugs don't really reveal anything else about the machine. Interestlngly, a section of your tag seems to be "missing." There is usually a third line that, when decoded, can tell you where it was sold and reconfirms what model number it was.

    The Doodle Bug was produced by Beam Manufacturing Company from 1946-1948 in five official models, simply designated A, B, C, D, and E.

    Knowing the differences between models can help you determine how your Doodle Bug was originally configured.

    A: Standard Briggs & Stratton powered scooter. Single control lever, "horse hoof" side covers, five slot belt guard, fluid drive, fuel shut off in tank, fuel filter on carb, push/pull kill switch, white grips

    B: Same but with Clinton engine.

    C: Side covers rounded at bottom, Briggs & Stratton powered, single control, black grips, toggle kill switch, fuel filter on tank with shutoff, three slot belt guard, change to centrifugal clutch

    D: Same, but with cut out on left side for belt pulley.

    E: Super Doodle Bug. Rounded side covers, Cut out on left side, Briggs and Stratton powered, throttle (left) and brake (right) plus parking brake


    Regarding Doodle Bug Engines:
    Type 306702 is correct for Standard Model A Doodle Bugs (24-5501 A)
    Type 306705 is correct for Model C and D Doodle Bugs (24-5501 C and D)
    Type 306715 is correct for Super Doodle Bug ("E") (24-5501 E)

    It is also possible that Briggs and Stratton NP type 306707 and 306709 engines are correct for Model C and Model D Doodle Bugs.

    Model B Doodle Bugs were equipped with the Clinton Engine.

    So, The correct engine for your machine is a Briggs & Stratton NP Type 306705 or a Type 306707 or 306709

    Yours should have the single control lever, black grips, toggle (rather than push/pull) kill switch, fuel filter with shut-off ON the tank, a 3 slot belt guard, and the centrifugal clutch. Side panels should be rounded, not "horses hoof" on yours as well

    By the way, the 3 three slot belt guard does not fit on machines designed for the 5 slot version and vice-versa. The mounting points on the guards and the frames (if they have not been butchered) are not the same.

    I collect and restore real 1946-1948 Doodle Bug scooters (to factory correct) and have done a lot of research (have seen a lot of Doodle Bugs). Most people do not do enough research and don't spend the time or money to restore them correctly...consequently very few really good correct examples exist to use for reference. Let me know if you have any other questions.

  6. #16
    Senior Member Oldsalt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doodle Bugger View Post
    Your ID tag indicates the machine is a model D (not a model C like someone else mentioned). The serial numbers on Doodle bugs don't really reveal anything else about the machine. Interestlngly, a section of your tag seems to be "missing." There is usually a third line that, when decoded, can tell you where it was sold and reconfirms what model number it was.

    The Doodle Bug was produced by Beam Manufacturing Company from 1946-1948 in five official models, simply designated A, B, C, D, and E.

    Knowing the differences between models can help you determine how your Doodle Bug was originally configured.

    A: Standard Briggs & Stratton powered scooter. Single control lever, "horse hoof" side covers, five slot belt guard, fluid drive, fuel shut off in tank, fuel filter on carb, push/pull kill switch, white grips

    B: Same but with Clinton engine.

    C: Side covers rounded at bottom, Briggs & Stratton powered, single control, black grips, toggle kill switch, fuel filter on tank with shutoff, three slot belt guard, change to centrifugal clutch

    D: Same, but with cut out on left side for belt pulley.

    E: Super Doodle Bug. Rounded side covers, Cut out on left side, Briggs and Stratton powered, throttle (left) and brake (right) plus parking brake


    Regarding Doodle Bug Engines:
    Type 306702 is correct for Standard Model A Doodle Bugs (24-5501 A)
    Type 306705 is correct for Model C and D Doodle Bugs (24-5501 C and D)
    Type 306715 is correct for Super Doodle Bug ("E") (24-5501 E)

    It is also possible that Briggs and Stratton NP type 306707 and 306709 engines are correct for Model C and Model D Doodle Bugs.

    Model B Doodle Bugs were equipped with the Clinton Engine.

    So, The correct engine for your machine is a Briggs & Stratton NP Type 306705 or a Type 306707 or 306709

    Yours should have the single control lever, black grips, toggle (rather than push/pull) kill switch, fuel filter with shut-off ON the tank, a 3 slot belt guard, and the centrifugal clutch. Side panels should be rounded, not "horses hoof" on yours as well

    By the way, the 3 three slot belt guard does not fit on machines designed for the 5 slot version and vice-versa. The mounting points on the guards and the frames (if they have not been butchered) are not the same.

    I collect and restore real 1946-1948 Doodle Bug scooters (to factory correct) and have done a lot of research (have seen a lot of Doodle Bugs). Most people do not do enough research and don't spend the time or money to restore them correctly...consequently very few really good correct examples exist to use for reference. Let me know if you have any other questions.
    Thank you for taking the time to write the above information. I'm going to print and save it in my Doodle Bug folder. What does a headlight look like? I'm registured to ride on the street and wish to have something that is close to original. I cannot properly restore the bike now. Too many costly parts missing [kickstart engine and some drive components]. But nothing will be altered. For now, I'm thinking it will be rather hard to find anyone within driving distance of here who would even know what a 46 Doodle Bug looks like, let alone what front rim is proper. Thanks again.
    Last edited by Oldsalt; 10-27-2009 at 11:47 PM. Reason: spelling

  7. #17
    Randy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldsalt View Post
    Thank you for taking the time to write the above information. I'm going to print and save it in my Doodle Bug folder. What does a headlight look like? I'm registured to ride on the street and wish to have something that is close to original. I cannot properly restore the bike now. Too many costly parts missing [kickstart engine and some drive components]. But nothing will be altered. For now, I'm thinking it will be rather hard to find anyone within driving distance of here who would even know what a 46 Doodle Bug looks like, let alone what front rim is proper. Thanks again.
    I'll echo OS's response. There is 6 of these total that I know of being "revived" here at omb, I know mini-matic and his brother are going 100%
    Mine should be close but it wont be 100% I had a easy start with what I got so the things that wont be original will be a matter of bolting them on if or when they become acquirable for me. I'm not molesting or hacking on the bike in any anyway. Thanks for your input. And mine is bagged Western Flyer on the front.
    Randy

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldsalt View Post
    What does a headlight look like? I'm registured to ride on the street and wish to have something that is close to original.

    The only accessories available were three headlight/taillight kits and one brake light kit which consisted of:

    1) Bendix model 30 headlight, Bendix 6-8v headlight generator, and Do-Ray taillight for Briggs & Stratton powered scooters only. Also included in the kit was a modified blower housing with a cut out to allow the drive wheel of the generator to make contact with the flywheel on the engine. A Bendix taillight with license plate bracket also exists, but does not seem to have ever been the standard offering and I've never seen one in person.

    2) Do-Ray headlight and taillight with a 6-volt battery (mounted under the seat) which would fit all scooters

    3) Make-A-Lite headlight and taillight with a 6-volt battery which would fit all scooters.

    In addition, there was one plastic Delta brake light kit that used a type D battery.

    Original Doodle Bug light kits are extremely difficult to find and lately have commanded prices upwards of $800. The Bendix generator requires a special, factory modified blower housing, and functions by having a drive wheel rub against the flywheel on the engine. The amount of light you could generate depended on how fast you were going. The generator drive wheels wore out very quickly and replacements are virtually impossible to find these days. All of the lenses (except on the Delta brake light) are glass and are also virtually impossible to find replacements for, so (in my opinion) using the very rare and "delicate" original accessories on anything other than a show bike would be risky.

    I would mount temporary lights designed for bicycles if I was set on riding a Doodle Bug at night as it seems like the cheapest, easiest, and safest thing to do.

    The photo shows (not one of mine) light kit No. 1 (Bendix headlight, generator, and Do-Ray taillight) mounted correctly:

 

 
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