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  1. #1
    Senior Member drenchedgremlin's Avatar
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    Feeler guage, compression tester for briggs engines?

    Hello. I would like to invest in a few tools. I want a feeler guage set that i can use for 2-5hp briggs. will a .0015 thru .035 tool include the sizes needed? Also Looking to get a compression tester. What is the best compression testing tool that i can buy for the price. Do i need a special one for small engines or will any work? Please link me some tools or give me some pointers on what i need to look for, If you have any info I would really appreciate it!

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    The feeler gauge should be fine . I never seen a briggs comp tester tho they just ues a spin test on the flywheel if it bounces back its good .

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    Senior Member lawn-boy biker's Avatar
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    spin test on the flywheel if it bounces back its good.
    Agreed and couldn't have said it better.
    Lost my compression tester in late '70's and never replaced it.

    ...give me some pointers on what i need to look for...
    Get a couple torque wrenches...inch lbs. & ft. lbs.
    Last edited by lawn-boy biker; 04-03-2018 at 03:56 PM.

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    I'm a double ASE master mechanic for a living and GM world class certified. I work as a mechanic for a living. The RIGHT tool and a GREAT tool are not necessarily mutually exclusive. I have a Snap-On, Matco, and Craftsman compression tester. All three read identical probably within +/- 1%. I keep the craftsman at home for home use because the hose that connects it to the engine is short (about 2 feet). The other two stay at work. The Matco has about a 4 foot hose and the Snap-On about a 5 foot hose. I keep two at work in case one quits working, I have a backup, as it's my livelihood. Craftsman makes a great, easy-to-read tool with every adapter you could ever dream of! Great bang for your buck, as the expensive one won't gain you much for mini bike repairs.

    As for feeler gauges, most feeler gauge sets range from .0015 to ,035. The only variations you need to consider are the purpose of what you will be using them for. They have angled blades (about 45 degrees) for places that are tough to reach, they also have tapered ends (that kind of form a point) so you can measure the clearance on a radius (think like between a throttle plate and the bore in a carburetor or throttle body). I have all different types and sizes, even some about 12" long to check my clutch packs and supercharger on my race car. They make a tool for everything, just depends on what you're looking for. No particular brand is better or worse than another, just make sure you get a brand you recognize, as the no-name stuff isn't finished with "as tight" of tolerances. I got my sets for work from Cornwell and they were rather inexpensive. I have Starrett for the race car because .0005" can make or break a successful run on the track.

    As for the torque wrenches mentioned above, I couldn't agree more. Too many folks under-estimate the value and purpose of one. As a side note, I have a racing friend with ARP who tested all of my torque wrenches. Snap-On, Matco, Mac, Cornwell, and Craftsman. The only ones that remained consistently within calibration each season were the Craftsman ones. All of the others were recalibrated and sold on ebay. My toolbox at work and my race team torque wrenches are all Craftsman now and in 6 years I have not had to a single one recalibrated.

    Hope this information makes sense and is helpful.

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    Senior Member 65ShelbyClone's Avatar
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    How old are your Craftsman torque wrenches?

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  9. #6
    Senior Member MB165's Avatar
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    if your getting into working on these little engines seriously consider buying a leak down tester, its a good way to look into a engine without pulling it down. if you eventually get any newer pull start engines, they are equipped with compression releases necessitating either spinning the engine in reverse or somehow disabling it to allow accurate compression readings.
    if you are just learning to use feeler gauges take out a individual leaf and use it loose. that will help you get a more accurate feel for where your at. try the next size up and down as well, when you can feel the difference between .020" and .021" you got it, not much but the feel is.

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    If you know someone with a set of micrometers, have them check the feeler gauges. We were sitting around one day and did just that. The results were a bit amazing. Some feeler gauges were off a bunch. Some it seemed like they used the same one for a couple thicknesses. .001 and .002 seemed to be the same, as did .012 and .014. Cheaper brands were the worst. I worked at a motorcycle shop that was a Clinton/ Briggs/ Tec dealer. For a quick, just to see test on compression we used the "thumb or finger" test. Put you thumb or finger over the plug hole, yank the rope, if it blows your digit off the head, the compression was good enough. Watch the spark plug wire as if you are not careful you can check for good spark this way. If the neighbors hear you swear, you had good spark. As in most things, tools get better as you spend more money. Buy the best you can afford, it's usually cheaper in the long run.

 

 

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