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  1. #1
    FOMOGO's Avatar
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    Another chassis fab thread

    Wanted to post this for others to see the jig fixtures and how things are setup to build a full frame. Hopefully this will give visual help to someone trying to fixture and square things on something they are building.

    This is a frame that is going under my personal 1956 F-100.

    Just a little history on the front snout. I am using a fabricated front snout that I picked up back in the late 90's. It is a Bill Funderburk design fabricated snout. Funderburk worked at H&M from the middle 60's into the 70's then went on to build chassis for his self. These are based on a 1965 Galaxie "rear steer" frame. They were the dominant chassis design until someone (Bobby Allison gets the credit in most circles) came up with the GM "front steer" chassis. The rear steers down fall was that it picked up a push as the race progressed. You had to set them up with a lot of static toe in so that they wouldn't toe out later in the race. When the front steer cars didn't develop a push later in the race they were the cure to that ill handling problem.

    I am building this to a Road Race chassis spec so that it will be a good street setup. The road race setups were equal right and left. The left turn chassis is skewed to turn left the best. I had to search for about 3 months to find a 9'' rear end housing that didn't have any camber in the tubes. Steve, the school instructor, had almost all of the front end components. Big brakes with 6 piston calipers, A-arms and steering that included a 16 to 1 Sweet Mfg power steering steering box. Would have liked for it to have been a 14 to 1 but the price was right.

    After a lengthy conversation with my friend Brent Vandervort, owner of Fatman Fabrications, I purchased 2'' x 6'' x 3/16'' tubing for the main rails. The factory Ford truck spec is 34'' outside to outside of the rails. First we centered and squared the front clip to the jig table. Then I cut and laid out the main rails. The right rail lined up with the right rail on the clip like it was meant to be that way. The left rail on the front clip is offset 2 inches outboard to increase header clearance. So the left main rail outside surface lined up with the left rail on the clip's inside surface. I cut a piece of 4'' x 6'' 3/16'' plate and made a flange that both rails could weld to. Then I added a 10'' x 6'' x 3/16'' plate to the outside to make a nice strong transition. The inside was a different story. I had a short area to work in and had to clear the steering box mounting tabs. So it is a oddly shaped piece that I had to bend in the press break. I used every available inch of surface to make as good of a transitional tie in as possible. I then plated the top with a piece of 1/8'' to tie all the pieces together.

    This will be an ongoing project for me so this thread will get updated periodically.

    In the pics the rails are squared to the table and are welded to the crossmember uprights so that they don't move around. The front clip is welded to the crossmembers as well. I made a rear crossmember with upright saddles for the rearend housing to sit in. On one end I drilled a single hole to bolt it down to the table. On the other end I slotted the hole about 1 inch long so that it could be swung forward or back to square it to the frame and front clip. The wheelbase is set at 115'' which is 5 inches longer than stock. The rear wheels are in the stock location but the front wheels are pushed forward 5''. I will have to cut the wheel opening out of the front fenders and move it forward 4'' to center the tire in the opening. The factory setup has the tires 1'' behind the center of the fender opening... This drastically improves the look of the fat fendered Effies. The leading part of the front fenders is larger than the trailing part. By moving the opening forward you reverse this front heaviness giving it a look of forward motion just sitting still.


    Here are some pics of the progress.

    Humble beginnings



    Starting



    Squared and tabbed to the table.



    Main rails laid out and lined up



    Main rails welded to the crossmember uprights and front clip. This shows the offset in the steering box area

    Last edited by FOMOGO; 07-18-2018 at 06:07 AM.
    "A day without laughter is a day wasted." - Charlie Chaplin
    If stupid could fly you would be a jet.
    Duct tape cant fix stupid but it can muffle the sound.

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  3. #2
    FOMOGO's Avatar
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    How I brought the rail offset together















    Right rail from the top




    What it takes to fix the front fender openings



    This truck also has the hood pie cut which I don't care for. It makes the profile kind of drool off the nose....
    Last edited by FOMOGO; 07-17-2018 at 10:28 PM.
    "A day without laughter is a day wasted." - Charlie Chaplin
    If stupid could fly you would be a jet.
    Duct tape cant fix stupid but it can muffle the sound.

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    Raskin's Avatar
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    Awsum...nice to see you enjoying the rewards of your hard work..

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    Very nice how you tied those rails together, very beefy with the gussets great job!
    And nice truck

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  9. #5
    FOMOGO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by massacre View Post
    Very nice how you tied those rails together, very beefy with the gussets great job!
    And nice truck
    Thankyou sir. Not my truck though. I wish I was that far along. Just an internet pic to demonstrate the moving of the wheel opening. My truck is still all together.

    This chassis was going to be done before my truck came apart but I am thinking that I will build a second truck with the spare 1956 cab I bought about 15 years ago. All the rest of the parts are available repopped. My complete 1956 truck is a 1 owner V-8 automatic Custom Cab that I find harder and harder to change it to far from a period hot rodded truck of the 60's. Meaning a 312 Y-block instead of the 272 and lower it with steel wheels and wide whites while retaining the straight axle.
    "A day without laughter is a day wasted." - Charlie Chaplin
    If stupid could fly you would be a jet.
    Duct tape cant fix stupid but it can muffle the sound.

  10. #6
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    Thanks for taking the time and effort to post this installment of a, as always, great tutorial.
    Last edited by SAT; 07-24-2018 at 04:28 PM.

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  12. #7
    FOMOGO's Avatar
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    Thought I would post an update on the chassis. Not as far along as I would like but it is coming along nicely. I have been busy making parts and fixtures. Fitting parts, modifying parts and welding pieces as they are ready.

    I started by drawing the frame rail kick up out on the table to make sure that I had enough clearance over the axle. Then made a paper pattern of the kick up. Spent more time than I wanted making a fixture to cut the kick ups. But it was worth the effort to have the repeatability for both sides. Got those cut and spent some time making sure they were both in the same plain front to rear and right to left. Got them clamped, lined up, double checked and then tacked it all in place. Welded them to the main rails and moved on to the cross member for the truck arm mounts. The crossmember was a snap but the 4 brackets that I had to make were time consuming... 2 brackets are straight forward with just 2 bolt holes each so that I can raise the front of the truck arms an additional inch if I lower the truck lower than the ride height that I am building at. It is currently set at 5 inches of ground clearance at the running boards and they will be 1 1/2'' higher than stock at that point... The other 2 brackets have been a challenge to get done. They have the dual height holes but they are slotted with an eccentric to adjust the wheelbase if needed. There is a full inch of adjustment available. They are initially set up with the bolt at the center of the adjustment.


    Here are some pics











    Last edited by FOMOGO; 08-09-2018 at 05:31 AM.
    "A day without laughter is a day wasted." - Charlie Chaplin
    If stupid could fly you would be a jet.
    Duct tape cant fix stupid but it can muffle the sound.

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  14. #8
    FOMOGO's Avatar
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    A few more of the progress.

    The Plasma I have been using at school. Its a little thing...




    More frame pics








    The truck arm brackets










    Fitted to the crossmember and ready for welding







    The fixed side





    The adjustable side

    "A day without laughter is a day wasted." - Charlie Chaplin
    If stupid could fly you would be a jet.
    Duct tape cant fix stupid but it can muffle the sound.

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    Senior Member Street Smart's Avatar
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    Are those rear arms stock C10? I like the adjustable height spring saddle.

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  18. #10
    FOMOGO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Street Smart View Post
    Are those rear arms stock C10? I like the adjustable height spring saddle.
    They are fabricated arms but are patterned after the C-10 arms. They use a school bus bushing in the front... Stiffer and larger diameter per Steve.
    "A day without laughter is a day wasted." - Charlie Chaplin
    If stupid could fly you would be a jet.
    Duct tape cant fix stupid but it can muffle the sound.

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